Subject: Bruderheim Meteorite
DescriptionThe largest recovered fall in Canada, Bruderheim was located and collected after a spectacular fireball was seen over a wide area on the 4th March, 1960. It has been widely studied by modern techniques of isotopic, trace element and electron microprobe analysis. It is a L6 chondrite. A stony meteorite containing abundant small spheroidal to ellipsoidal bodies known as "chondrules". It belongs to the low-iron ("L") chemical group and to petrologic type "6" indicating substantial textural modifications (such as in the definition of the chondrule margins) during high-temperature annealing. The essential minerals present are orthopyroxene, olivine, troilite, kamacite and taenite with minor amounts of plagioclase feldspar (or maskelynite), clinopyroxene, chromite, ilmenite, chlorapatite and/or merrillite, and probably tetrataenite.
NoteThe stones making up the Bruderheim fall vary enormously in size from 31 kg downwards. The slide gives some idea of this size range. It will be noted that virtually all the fragments show the typical black fusion crust, indicating that fragmentation took place during the passage through the atmosphere while the meteor was still traveling fast enough to cause frictional surface fusion. The largest piece of such a shower tends to travel furthest and thus end up towards the end of the ellipse of fall furthest from the radiant of the fireball.
SourceDr. D.G.W. Smith; MIAC Web Site
Source NotesMeteorite and Impact Advisory Committee
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  • Bruderheim meteorite fall. Photo dated March 1960.

    Bruderheim meteorite fall. Photo dated March 1960.
    Bruderheim meteorite fall. Photo dated March 1960.
    Bruderheim meteorite fall. Photo dated March 1960.
    Bruderheim meteorite fall. Photo dated March 1960.
    Bruderheim meteorite fall. Photo dated March 1960.




        
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